Microwaves in Organic Synthesis by Antonio de la Hoz, André Loupy

By Antonio de la Hoz, André Loupy

The lengthy awaited re-creation of this accomplished two-volume reference has been thoroughly up to date and accelerated by way of 30% to incorporate chapters on ionic beverages, carbohydrate chemistry, multicomponent reactions, stable section peptide synthesis, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. Written by means of the main eminent scientists of their respective fields, the chapters, which counterpoint each other, now additionally comprise 8 new fields of program, akin to heterocyclic chemistry, cycloadditions and carbohydrate chemistry. moreover, very promising thoughts below improvement are handled, as a result of the applying of microwave irradiation to combinatorial chemistry, radiochemistry and photochemistry.

the normal reference during this booming box.

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Microwaves in Organic Synthesis

The lengthy awaited re-creation of this accomplished two-volume reference has been thoroughly up to date and extended via 30% to incorporate chapters on ionic beverages, carbohydrate chemistry, multicomponent reactions, good section peptide synthesis, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. Written via the main eminent scientists of their respective fields, the chapters, which counterpoint each other, now additionally contain 8 new fields of program, equivalent to heterocyclic chemistry, cycloadditions and carbohydrate chemistry.

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In contrast with magnetic properties, dielectric properties are group properties and cannot be modeled by an interaction between a single dipole and electric field. A group of dipoles interacting among themselves could be considered. The origin of confusion between the behavior of a single species and a collection, or the difference between dilute and condensed phases, is the most important problem and the source of illusions within microwave athermal effects. 1 Effect of the Real Part: Polarization and Storage of Electromagnetic Energy The physical origin of polarization Polarization phenomena are expressed by the quantity ~ P which gives contribution of matter compared with that of a vacuum.

The number of representative points which pass across unit length of y in unit time is described by Eq. (24): qq qf ðyÞ ¼ ÀK þ f ðhy_iÞ qy qy ð24Þ where the first term describes a diffusive process with a specific constant K and the second term describes the effect of the electric field which sets the molecules in rotation with an average terminal angular velocity depending of the orientating couple and on resistive constant or damping constant of inner friction given by Eq. (25): zðhy_iÞ ¼ ~ cos y ÀqpE qy ð25Þ 19 20 1 Microwave–Material Interactions and Dielectric Properties At equilibrium, molecular energies will be distributed according to Boltzman’s law and, finally, the general formulation which defines the factor f is given by Eq.

K TOOLS More about photon–matter interaction Depending on the frequency, the electromagnetic field can induce oscillation of one or more types of charges association. For each configuration with its own critical frequency above which interaction with the field becomes vanishingly small, the lower the frequency the more configurations are excited. Electrons of the inner atomic shells have a critical frequency approximately that of X-rays. Consequently an electromagnetic field of wavelength more than 10À10 m cannot excite any vibrations, but rather induces ionization of these atoms.

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