Joan of Arc and the Hundred Years War by Deborah A. Fraioli

By Deborah A. Fraioli

When in Henry II of britain married Eleanor of Aquitaine of France in 1154 A.D., he grew to become instantly the reigning sovereign over an enormous stretch of land extending throughout all of britain and 1/2 France—and but, in keeping with the feudal hierarchy of the days, a vassal to the King of France. this case, which positioned French and English borders in this kind of tenuous place, solidified the precarious flooring on which the Hundred Years battle used to be to be fought 183 years later. This epic border conflict—which used to be contemporaneous with the age of renowned uprisings and the Bubonic Plague, fought in response to enduring notions of chivalry and the budding satisfaction of nationality, and which numbered between its individuals Richard II, the Black Prince of Wales, Henry IV, Henry V, and Charles of Navarre—ultimately depended upon a peasant girl, Joan of Arc, to enhance the French perfect of a sacred country, swing the pendulum once again towards the French, and produce this perennial clash to an end.

When in 1154 A.D. Henry II of britain married Eleanor of Aquitaine of France, he turned straight away the reigning sovereign over an unlimited stretch of land extending throughout all of britain and half France, and but, in line with the feudal hierarchy of the days, a vassal to the King of France. this case, which positioned French and English borders in any such tenuous place, solidified the precarious floor on which the Hundred Years struggle was once to be fought 183 years later. This epic border conflict—which was once contemporaneous with the age of well known uprisings and the Bubonic Plague, fought based on enduring notions of chivalry and the budding delight of nationality, and which numbered between its individuals Richard II, the Black Prince of Wales, Henry IV, Henry V, and Charles of Navarre—ultimately depended upon a peasant girl, Joan of Arc, to augment the French perfect of a sacred country, swing the pendulum once again towards the French, and convey this perennial clash to an end.

Topics of the topic essays were chosen to teach the variety of this advanced battle, and contain discussions of: the origins of the battle; the age of renowned uprising; chivalry's impression on 14th and fifteenth century war; the faith of the monarchy and the function of sacred kingship within the construction of the French monarchy; and Joan of Arc's figuring out of the warfare. An annotated timeline and a chronology of French and English Kings supply readers with an easy-to-follow review of the Hundred Years struggle and the rulers who presided over it. Nineteen biographical sketches of key French and English figures lend a human point to ancient names; and 14 annotated basic records breathe clean lifestyles into the subject, and supply scholars and readers with a brand new examine the interval. The ebook concludes with an annotated bibliography and index.

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The Flemish revolt, led by Philip van Artevelde, son of the earlier agitator, worried France the most given the potential for an Anglo-Flemish alliance. So when van Artevelde sought aid from Eng- lix lx Historical Overview land, the French, under the command of Philip the Bold, duke of Burgundy, helped Philip’s father-in-law Count Louis of Male defeat the rebels at Roosebeke in 1382. By this maneuver, Philip the Bold not only managed to safeguard his Flemish inheritance but also received handsome payment for his military expenses from both the young Charles VI and Louis of Male.

The previous year Charles VI had declared that henceforth he would manage his own affairs. At that time, he had recalled his father’s counsellors, derisively termed Marmousets, or “little boys,” for their questionable pedigrees. The looting of the royal treasury by the four princes ended, and a more frugal era began. When a series of short truces were set to expire in 1398, a twenty-eight-year truce was announced. As so often happened, however, an event not directly related to the war between France and England had an unexpected effect on its course.

Richard II succeeds to throne of England. 1378 A wave of popular revolutions begins in Europe lasting four years. 1379 Rebellion begins in Flanders including Ghent, Ypres, and Bruges. 1380 Charles V dies. Son Charles VI succeeds to throne of France. Thirty-five-year cessation of fighting in Hundred Years War begins. 1381 Wat Tyler leads Peasants’ Revolt. 1382 January 26: Philip van Artevelde, son of Jacob van Artevelde, becomes captain of Ghent. February: Rebellion in Rouen known as the Harelle. March: Rebellion in Paris known as the Maillotins.

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