Broadway Boogie Woogie: Damon Runyon and the Making of New by D. Schwarz

By D. Schwarz

Damon Runyon's acceptance and value in shaping Amer-ican pop culture throughout the first half the 20th century can infrequently be exaggerated. In vigorous and exuberant chapters that come with a breathtaking view of recent York urban among the area Wars-with an emphasis at the city's colourful nightlife-Schwarz examines almost each aspect of Runyon's profession, from sports-writer, day-by-day columnist, trial re-porter, and Hollywood determine to the writer of the nonetheless greatly learn brief tales that have been the resource of the Broad-way hit men and Dolls. whereas examining Runyon's high-spirited paintings when it comes to old contexts, pop culture, and of the altering functionality of the media, Schwarz argues that during his columns and tales Runyon was once an integral determine in developing our public pictures of recent York urban tradition, inclu-ding our curiosity within the demimonde and underworld that explains partly the good fortune of The Godfather motion pictures and the Sopranos. As a part of his dialogue of Runyon's artwork and artistry of Runyon's fiction, he skillfully examines the distinctive language of the Broadway tales often called 'Runyonese' and explains how 'Runyonese' has turn into an adjective describing flamboyant habit.

Show description

Read or Download Broadway Boogie Woogie: Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture PDF

Similar theatre books

Banned Plays: Censorship Histories of 125 Stage Dramas (Facts on File Library of World Literature)

As public tastes switch, so does the character of renowned drama. within the 5th century BCE, Aristophanes' "Lysistrata" attracted censors for its topics of wifely uprising and intercourse. From the fifteenth to the 18th centuries, performs have been censored essentially for non secular or political purposes. within the nineteenth century, social and sexual purposes for censorship emerged, and smooth moralists have objected to works through such playwrights as Arthur Miller, Eugene O'Neill, and Lillian Hellman.

Four Plays By Eugene O'Neill (Beyond the Horizon; The Emperor Jones; Anna Christie; The Hairy Ape)

Winner of 4 Pulitzer Prizes and the 1st American dramatist to obtain a Nobel Prize, Eugene O'Neill crammed his performs with wealthy characterization and leading edge language, taking the outcasts and renegades of society and depicting their Olympian struggles with themselves-and with future.

Contents:

Beyond the Horizon
The Emperor Jones
Anna Christie
The bushy Ape

German Expressionist Theatre: The Actor and the Stage

German Expressionist Theatre considers the powerfully stylized, antirealistic kinds of symbolic performing on the German Expressionist level from 1916 to 1921. It relates this remarkable departure from the dominant eu appearing culture of realism to the categorical cultural crises that enveloped the German country in the course of the process its involvement in international warfare I.

A Retake Please!: Night Mail to Western Approaches

This memoir is an strange contribution to the historical past of movie and cinema. At its centre is the tale of the making of the British movie vintage Western ways, the 1st tale documentary in Technicolor, absolutely enacted by means of amateurs. It was once nominated for the easiest movie from any resource Oscar.

Extra resources for Broadway Boogie Woogie: Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture

Sample text

The growth of advertising was a major factor in the flourishing of magazines in which Runyon’s work appeared. 10 With the increasing dominance of New York in literary culture, it is not surprising that a great many of the major American magazines were published in New York. ”11 Although these magazines were national and international in coverage, they often stressed the glamour of New York, where celebrities, particularly those in the theater, resided. ”12 Many factors, of course, went into the making of the world Runyon describes.

The pugnacious Winchell varied his content from day to day to satisfy his diverse audience—Mondays were for gossip, Tuesdays and Thursdays he focused on anecdotes and jokes, and Saturdays he wrote about obscure facts. While in his columns Winchell did take on somewhat different personae, he did not do so in the wildly inventive way that Runyon did. The growth of advertising was a major factor in the flourishing of magazines in which Runyon’s work appeared. 10 With the increasing dominance of New York in literary culture, it is not surprising that a great many of the major American magazines were published in New York.

Runyon’s view was not too different; he at once celebrated and condemned promiscuity. Evergood and Marsh were patronized by highbrow critics for similar reasons as Runyon. On first encounter, all three seemed more interested in subject matter than technique and used popular forms and seemingly unsophisticated techniques to communicate viscerally with a larger audience. Moreover, they relied on exaggerations and even grotesque and distorted perspectives. Another painter who helps us understand Runyon is John Marin (1870–1953), especially his 1936 series of watercolors, including “City Movement, Downtown Manhattan #2” (1936), which had much in common with Runyon’s rendering of the city’s vitality and energy.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.01 of 5 – based on 12 votes