Advances in Marine Biology: Cumulative Subject Index Volumes by Alan J. Southward, Paul A. Tyler, Craig M. Young, Lee A.

By Alan J. Southward, Paul A. Tyler, Craig M. Young, Lee A. Fuiman

Advances in Marine Biology has been supplying in-depth and updated stories on all points of Marine Biology when you consider that 1963. quantity forty five is a cumulative topic and taxonomic index quantity, supplying a prepared consultant to all study lined in volumes 20 - forty four of the sequence, together with either eclectic and thematic volumes that research a selected box intimately, corresponding to 'The Biochemical Ecology of Marine Fishes' and 'Molluscan Radiation'. * sequence Encompasses forty Years of assurance. * Cumulative topic and Taxonomic index for sequence Volumes 20- forty four

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Extra info for Advances in Marine Biology: Cumulative Subject Index Volumes 20-44

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Minimum salinity 34: 141 vs. minimum temperature 34: 141 vs. radiation balance 34: 125 vs. under-estimation (UE), 34: 123 vs.

E. Australian intertidal 23: 96 – 99 synthetic ideas 23: 117– 126 types 23: 72 24 CUMULATIVE SUBJECT INDEXES FOR VOLUMES 20–44 versus physiological competence 23: 145 Biotic sources of variability 30: 241 Biotoxicology 21: 66 Biotoxins 21: 66 BIOTRANS 30: 5, 6, 19, 21, 35, 38, 52, 53, 61, 64, 65, 73, 75 Bioturbation and Protobranch bivalves 42: 32, 33 Biovolumes, plankton 29: 83 Bird Rock platform 20: 254, 255, 256 Birds 34: 258 changes in kittiwake and fulmar populations 34: 285, 285 metazoan 25: 147, 148, 149, 150, 152, 158 oil effects parasites of 25: 119, 122, 125, 129, 138, 141, 142 predation 25: 4, 32, 47, 64, 196 prey removal 34: 268– 274, 269 seabirds, seaducks, shorebirds 39: 64 – 70, 65, 67, 69 terrestrial birds 39: 45 – 48, 46 Birth rate 29: 249 see also Fecundity Birth rates, seaweed 23: 6 Biscay, Bay of 29: 235, 236, 242, 298, 326, 327, 351 see also Vilaine, Bay of reproduction 29: 271– 273, 275, 289 Bivalve embryos and larvae 37: 1 – 175 see also bioassay; laboratory rearing; pollutants; statistical methods; toxicity tests biology 37: 10 – 25 see also reproduction; species future research 37: 137, 138 Bivalve molluscs, stress detection and responses to heavy and toxic metals 22: 132, 133, 143– 146 salinity 22: 133, 134, 137– 143, 145 calcium ion dependence 22: 138, 139, 141 heart rate 22: 111– 116 copper effect 22: 117– 119 temperature effect 22: 130– 132 zinc effect 22: 118– 121 heavy metal effects 22: 104, 105, 129, 132, 133, 143– 146 accumulation in tissues 22: 162, 163 behaviour and physiology changes 22: 163– 168 calcium role 22: 176– 179 gametogenesis inhibition 22: 166, 168, 169, 173 growth inhibition 22: 167 mitochondrial respiration and 22: 176– 181 unfertilized eggs and 22: 173– 175 methods for monitoring of “activity” 22: 107, 108 heart activity 22: 105, 106 shell growth 22: 107 valve movements 22: 106, 107 water pumping 22: 106, 107 mortality copper-induced 22: l22 – 123T zinc-induced 22: 122, 123T nature of stress 22: 104, 105 pollutants, threshold 22: 104, 105 pumping activity 22: 112– 116 salinity effect 22: 113, 116 respiration anaerobic 22: 146– 150 glycogen increase 22: 149 metabolism 22: 148– 150 heart rate and 22: 146– 148, 155 pH decrease 22: 151– 155 valve movements and 22: 146– 148 sensory receptors in inhalant siphon 22: 134– 136 in mantle 22: 134– 136 shell calcium reabsorption from 22: 156– 162 physical protection 22: 155, 156 strength reduction 22: 161, 162 sublethal stress levels 22: 128– 130 avoidance behaviour and 22: 129, 130 valve movements 22: 108–112, 116 effects of copper 22: 117– 119 salinity 22: 110, 113 temperature 22: 109 zinc 22: 118– 121 in epifaunal and infaunal species 22: 121, 124– 128 oxygen consumption and 22: 125– 128 Bivalves 29: 252; 34: 418, 419 burrowing rate, comparison with gastropods 28: 421, 422 clearance rates 28: 311 comparisons with brachiopods 28: 354– 356 CUMULATIVE SUBJECT INDEXES FOR VOLUMES 20–44 deep-sea species diversity 35: 5 dimensions and mantle cavity volumes 28: 357 genetic differentiation 35: 81 genetic identity related to taxonomic divergence 35: 69 growth performance 35: 167– 173, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175 hydrothermal vents 35: 18, 19 oxygen consumption 28: 319 oxygen-minimum zones 35: 25 seeps 35: 23 Bivalves, burrowing 25: 198, 235 Bivalvia, hybridization bias in 31: 39 Bjørnsen 29: 86 Black Sea 35: 24; 36: 3 adaptation 36: 44 food and feeding 36: 47 – 49, 56, 57 oxygen level 36: 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 432 temperature 36: 7 – 9, 11, 12 –14, 18 adaptation strategies energy metabolism 36: 60 –74, 60, 64, 66, 67, 73, 74 plastic metabolism 36: 75 – 82, 75, 77, 81, 82, 85, 86 Calanus euxinus, vertical distribution of biomass 32: 41 ctenophores 32: 42 differentiation and variability 36: 222, 224, 225, 226 ecological principles 36: 232, 238, 239, 241, 246, 248 indicators of fish condition 36: 213, 218 lipids 36: 207, 208– 211, 212 life cycles abundance, dynamics of 36: 125, 129, 130, 132, 137 annual 36: 105, 107, 108, 112– 114 daily rhythms 36: 115– 117 interannual fluctuations 36: 118, 119 ontogenesis 36: 96, 101, 104 mesoplankton 32: 40, 41 Black Sea anchovy 20: 71, 74 Black smokers 23: 303, 308, 318; 35: 17 faunal distribution and density 23: 340 microbial productivity 23: 318 Blackwater Estuary 29: 293 Blastocones, Cephalopoda 25: 92, 93, 94 Blastodinida, parasitic 25: 127 Blastomeres, Cephalopoda 25: 92, 93, 94 Blastula phase, sole 29: 229 25 Blastulation, Cephalopoda 25: 86, 87, 108 Bleached (and dead) coral reef organisms Plate 4, 43: 280, 284, 292, 293, 306– 308, 309 Bleak 36: 183, 190, 227 Blenny 36: 17, 66, 190 Blood 36: 94, 213, 214, 221 see also circulation adaptation strategies 36: 62, 63, 64, 66, 73, 84 haemoglobin levels 24: 350–356 oxygen affinity 24: 353, 355, 356 Scaphopoda 42: 185– 188, 187 Blood circulation, Donax and Bullia 25: 200– 203, 205, 206 Bloom conditions 29: 4, 59, 60, 79 Baltic Sea 29: 87, 92 – 97, 93, 95, 96, 98 – 101, 99 – 101 nutrients 29: 103, 104, 106–110, 107, 108, 116, 117, 110 dissolved organic matter 29: 32, 35 fronts 29: 50 – 58, 51, 53, 55 – 58 predators 29: 20 –22 – 24, 23, 26 seasonal events 29: 42 – 47, 43, 43, 46, 47 sedimentation 29: 36, 39, 40, 41 wind events 29: 47 – 50, 48, 49 Bloom, planktonic, misuse of term 23: 233 see also Plankton; Red tides “Blooms” 37: 125– 127, 127 Blooms 21: 65, 70, 74; 43: 197, 198, 231– 233, 235, 308 Blooms, exceptional see Exceptional phytoplankton blooms Blue grenadier (hoki) fishery 35: 107 –109 Blue shark 36: 78 Bluefish 36: 77 Body axes, Cephalopoda 25: 102 Body density, sinking rate and 33: 409, 414, 415– 417 Body form 33: 4, 14, 15 see also Morphology Body size of bivalve larva see also age and toxicity reaction 37: 118, 119 shells 37: 63 Body size see Size Body size, Donax and Bullia 25: 216, 217, 217, 226, 227, 228– 230 Body size/length 43: 213 and fecundity of invertebrates 43: 131– 134, 140, 148, 152 and parasites 43: 31, 32, 33, 36 26 CUMULATIVE SUBJECT INDEXES FOR VOLUMES 20–44 and diversity 43: 5, 8 and latitude 43: 51 feeding organ sizes compared 43: 29, 30 genital hook 43: 12 hamuli lengths compared 43: 10, 13,15 hosts of 43: 15, 33 – 35 Body weight 33: 221– 235, 333– 337 ash weight 33: 233–235, 235 ash-free dry weight 33: 227, 233, 234 dry weight 33: 227– 233, 228– 222, 334, 335, 337 wet weight 33: 221– 226, 223– 225, 226 Bogoslof Island, pollock near 37: 180, 183, 184 population dynamics 37: 193, 194, 195, 196, 197 population structure 37: 217, 219, 221, 233 Bohusla¨n herring period 20: 127 Boothbay Harbor, ME, hatchery 38: 8 Bootstrap methods in classification in benthic studies 26: 219, 220 Bornholm Basin 29: 76 Bothidae 29: 219 Bothidae as predators 27: 362 Bothnian, Sea of 29: 74, 75, 75, 76, 80, 86, 87, 116 autotrophic picoplankton 29: 88, 89 bacterioplankton 29: 94, 96, 98, 99, 100, 111, 113 Bottlenecks heterozygosity and 35: 64 hydrothermal vents 35: 20, 21, 64 seeps 35: 23 Bottom trawl surveys of pollock 37: 193– 196 “bottom-up” approach to resource evaluation 38: 30, 39 Boudouresques’s taxonomic synthesis 23: 58 – 62 steps involved 23: 58 Bounded hybrid superiority hypothesis 31: 53 Bourrelets 23: 190– 195, 267, 268 and seawater chemistry 23: 192– 195 evidence for existence 23: 189, 190 nitrogen reserves 23: 193– 195, 242 nutrient accumulation 23: 194 nutrient mixing from 23: 194–197, 241, 242, 267 tidal periodicity 23: 194– 197 oxygen minimums 23: 192 seasonal effects 23: 190 Boyle’s Law 20: 147 Bracco – Curti test 29: 155, 156 Brachiopods articulate and inarticulate, World Ocean 32: 403 E and W Pacific distribution 32: 398, 399 latitudinal faunistic belts, World Ocean 32: 395 relicts 32: 409, 411 vertical distribution 32: 393 Brachiopods, classification 28: 179,359, 360 Brachiopods, comparisons with bivalves 28: 354– 356 dimensions and mantle cavity volumes 28: 357 Brachiopods, development 28: 273– 282 development type 28: 265 larva early 28: 278, 279 hatching 28: 279 –282 juvenile development after settlement 28: 282 pigment spots and setae 28: 248 mantle 28: 185– 187 oocyte cleavage 28: 278 oocyte diameters 28: 265, 282 summary 28: 277– 282 times for embryological features to appear, comparisons 28: 282 Brachiopods, ecology 28: 332– 346 community ecology 28: 345, 346 geographic distribution 28: 346 life history strategies 28: 333– 337 growth rate 28: 335– 337 patterns 28: 337 recruitment 28: 333– 335 survivorship 28: 337– 345 competition 28: 339– 341 disturbance 28: 341 pathology 28: 341, 342 patterns 28: 342– 345 predation 28: 337– 339 Brachiopods, genetics and biochemical systematics 28: 347– 352 classification 28: 179, 359, 360 enzyme systems 28: 347, 348 immunology 28: 349– 352 unweighted pair-group using averages (UPMGA) 28: 351, 352 morphometric analysis 28: 349 palaeontological studies 28: 177, 354 single-linkage cluster analysis 28: 353 CUMULATIVE SUBJECT INDEXES FOR VOLUMES 20–44 terminology 28: 178 Brachiopods, physiology and metabolism 28: 282– 332 digestion 28: 312– 316 distribution of enzymes, selected species 28: 315 energy turnover 28: 355, 356, 358 environmental tolerances anoxia 28: 330 salinity 28: 329, 330 temperature 28: 329 turbidity 28: 331, 332 excretion and ionic regulation 28: 322– 325 feeding clearance rates 28: 310– 312 feeding currents 28: 292–295 food sources 28: 306– 309 nutritional sources 28: 306– 309 particle capture 28: 295– 300 particle rejection mechanisms 28: 302, 303 particle retention efficiency 28: 309, 310 particle transport 28: 300– 304 quantitative physiology 28: 309– 312 selectivity 28: 304– 306 metabolic pathways 28: 325– 328 respiratory physiology 28: 316– 322 freeliving inarticulates 28: 288– 292 oxygen exchange 28: 320–322 rates of oxygen consumption 28: 317– 320 rates of water transport 28: 316, 317 respiratory proteins 28: 322 sensory/neuromuscular physiology/ behaviour 28: 282– 292 sessile articulates 28: 285– 288 Brachiopods, reproduction 28: 248– 273 adaptations 28: 358, 359 fertilization 28: 277, 278 gametogenesis 28: 255– 270 oogenesis 28: 258– 270 spermatogenesis 28: 249, 255– 258 ‘genital pits’ 28: 192 gonad shape, various brachiopods 28: 253 hermaphroditism 28: 265 morphology 28: 250– 254 genital lamella 28: 251–253 gonad development 28: 253, 254 oocyte diameters 28: 282 27 oocyte maturation 28: 277, 278 reproductive cycles 28: 272, 273 published data 28: 274– 276 sexual dimorphism 28: 250 spawning 28: 270– 272 brooding species 28: 271, 272 free-spawning species 28: 270, 271 strategies 28: 265 vitellogenesis 28: 259– 270 Brachiopods, structure and functional morphology 28: 178– 248 coelomic and vascular system 28: 212– 217 amoeboid cells 28: 215, 216 blood cells 28: 214 coelomocyte types 28: 213, 214– 217 general structure 28: 213, 214 spindle bodies 28: 216 digestive system 28: 226– 236 digestive cells 28: 233, 234 diverticula 28: 231– 234 functional morphology 28: 234– 236 intestine 28: 229, 230 type A secretory cells 28: 232, 233 type B secretory cells 28: 234 general characteristics 28: 178, 179 lophopore 28: 217– 226 blood vessels 28: 225 coelomic epithelium 28: 224, 225 connective tissue 28: 222– 224 epidermis 28: 217– 222 myoepithelia 28: 225 nerves 28: 224 mantle 28: 179– 200 caeca 28: 194– 200 development 28: 185– 187 gamete load 28: 192 general structure 28: 182– 185 generative region 28: 187– 200 inner mantle membrane 28: 182, 189– 192 mantle canal (sinus) 28: 193 outer mantle membrane 28: 182, 183, 193 ultrastructure 28: 187– 189, 195, 196 muscle arrangement 28: 237– 239 muscular system 28: 236– 244 myoepithelial cells 28: 240, 241 nerves and sensory structures 28: 244– 248 gap junctions 28: 245 setae (chaetae) 28: 246, 247 28 CUMULATIVE SUBJECT INDEXES FOR VOLUMES 20–44 statocysts 28: 245, 246 paramyosin 28: 243, 244 smooth muscles 28: 243 striated adductor muscles 28: 242 ultrastructure 28: 240–248 pedicle 28: 200– 212 classification 28: 210– 212 functional morphology 28: 209, 210 general structure 28: 201– 209 muscular system 28: 239 regeneration 28: 210 rootlet and bulb structure 28: 208, 209 trunk 28: 203– 208 shell secretion 28: 247 Brachyura, spermatophores 29: 130, 133, 195 chemical composition 29: 136– 139, 138, 139 copulatory organs 29: 139–141 dehiscence 29: 145 morphology 29: 133– 135, 197 origin 29: 135, 136 sperm receipt and storage 29: 141– 145, 198, 200 sperm transfer 29: 139, 199 Brackish water 33: 472– 479 estuaries 33: 474, 475– 477 fjords 33: 349– 351, 350, 477– 479, 478 river plumes 33: 474, 475 Brackish water, parasites 25: 146 Brackish water, parasites in 43: 55 Brain 33: 38 Brandt’s cormorant 20: 241, 243, 244 Bray-Curtis similarity coefficients in benthic studies 26: 182, 215, 216, 218 Brazil, coastal areas of 43: 11, 50 Breakage and repair of shells 42: 152, 281– 286, 282– 284 Bream 36: 25, 250 annular see annular gilthead egg quality 26: 74, 77, 84, 98, 99, 101 vertical migration in 26: 120, 121 Breeding biology see Reproduction Breeding fish see Farming, fish; Reproduction Breeding season, Donax and Bullia 25: 194, 236 Breeding seasonality, pycnogonid 24: 43, 44 breeding sex ratio, P.

Wetland area 34: 144 water exchange characteristics 34: 135 data 34: 135– 139 variables 34: 136 yield 34: 80 – 82, 80, 110, 122, 131–133, 138 and anthropogenic characteristics 34: 135 and latitude 34: 119 data 34: 179– 183 distribution 34: 123 per unit area according to tidal prism (TF) 34: 138 per unit area as function of fishing pressure 34: 145 records 34: 117, 118 vs. latitude 34: 125 vs. mean nitrite– nitrogen concentration 34: 142 vs. minimum salinity 34: 141 vs. minimum temperature 34: 141 vs.

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